Wage & Hour

  • July 11, 2024

    Ex-Sushi Restaurant Driver Should Get $23K In OT Case

    A former delivery driver of a Manhattan sushi restaurant should receive about $23,000 in damages in his suit claiming unpaid wages, a New York federal judge recommended, significantly lowering what the worker had asked for.

  • July 11, 2024

    Iowa Mexican Restaurants Pay $49K After DOL Probe

    Two Mexican restaurants in Iowa paid nearly $49,000 in back wages and damages for denying 18 workers their overtime pay, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Thursday.

  • July 11, 2024

    IT Staffing Agency's Terms Exploit Workers, DOL Tells Court

    An information technology staffing agency engages in "modern-day indentured servitude" via contract provisions that tether employees to jobs, forcing them to pay up to $30,000 if they leave the company, and chill their complaints, the U.S. Department of Labor told a New York federal court.

  • July 11, 2024

    Wash. Justices Agree To Review State's Pot Co. Wage Suit

    The Washington Supreme Court has agreed to review whether the state labor agency jumped the gun by suing a cannabis company to collect back pay for employees before the agency knew how much money the workers were owed.

  • July 10, 2024

    ​GOP Bombards Agencies With Demands After Chevron's End

    Republican leaders of major congressional committees Wednesday demanded details from dozens of agencies on policies suddenly shrouded in uncertainty after U.S. Supreme Court conservatives overturned the so-called Chevron doctrine, which for 40 years gave regulators flexibility in rulemaking and advantages in related litigation.

  • July 10, 2024

    Texas Court Severs Constable Workers From OT Collective

    A Texas federal court granted Harris County Sheriff's Department deputies' request to cut several employees from the constable's office from their proposed collective action accusing the department of shorting them on overtime pay, and rejected the county's argument that the case should largely be thrown out.

  • July 10, 2024

    DOL Can't Stop Discovery Disclosures In Fishery Wage Suit

    The U.S. Department of Labor didn't show how a Mississippi federal court erred in ordering the agency to turn over the identities of some migrant workers who participated in the department's investigation of a fishery, the court ruled Wednesday, standing by its earlier decision.

  • July 10, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Nev. Call Center Agents' Bootup Warrants Trial

    The Ninth Circuit on Wednesday revived, for a second time, call center agents' collective action alleging the time spent turning on and off their computers before their shifts is payable under the Fair Labor Standards Act, finding that to be a factual issue that should be resolved through a jury trial.

  • July 10, 2024

    Performer Hits Atlanta Drag Bar With Wages Class Action

    A performer at Lips Restaurant Atlanta LLC, a bar that provides drag show entertainment to diners and patrons, has filed a proposed class action against the restaurant, its owners and its general manager for allegedly failing to pay proper minimum and overtime wages.

  • July 10, 2024

    4 State AI Bills To Watch In 2nd Half Of 2024

    After Colorado recently moved to the forefront of regulating artificial intelligence in the workplace, numerous other states across the ideological spectrum — including conservative bastions like Oklahoma — are considering legislation of their own. Here, Law360 looks at four bills to regulate the use of AI in the workplace that bear watching in the second half of 2024. 

  • July 10, 2024

    Teamsters Lose 3rd Circ. Fight Over Belated Wage Grievance

    The Third Circuit on Wednesday issued a rare opinion declining to enforce a union's arbitration win, saying a Teamsters unit waited too long to challenge a cemetery operator's read of their new contract's raise language.

  • July 10, 2024

    X Corp., Musk Dodge $500M Severance Suit

    X Corp. and Elon Musk can escape claims they owe former employees $500 million in severance following the business mogul's purchase of the social platform formerly known as Twitter, a California federal judge ruled, saying the facts don't show that federal benefits law governed the payments workers received.

  • July 10, 2024

    Va. Restaurant Pays $172K For Stiffing Workers On OT

    A restaurant in Virginia paid more than $172,000 in back wages and damages for denying 21 workers overtime rates, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday.

  • July 10, 2024

    Red State Resistance To DOL Child Labor Enforcement Grows

    Republican governors and state legislators are pushing back against the U.S. Department of Labor's attempts to rein in unlawful child labor, a federal effort those at the state level argue is hurting employers.

  • July 10, 2024

    New Orleans Home Care Co. Pays $110K For OT Violations

    A home care company in New Orleans paid $110,000 in back wages and damages for denying workers overtime rates, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • July 09, 2024

    7th Circ. Passes On Look At 2-Step Cert. Process, For Now

    A Seventh Circuit panel turned down pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly & Co.'s challenge to an Indiana federal court's decision to grant collective certification in an age discrimination suit, but said it would be open to looking at the two-step certification process in place to greenlight collectives.

  • July 09, 2024

    DOL, Pa. Mexican Restaurant Ink $1.3M Deal To End Tip Suit

    A Mexican restaurant in Pennsylvania will pay more than $1.3 million in back wages, damages and fines to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it kept portions of workers' tips and denied proper overtime rates, according to federal court papers filed Tuesday.

  • July 09, 2024

    Dallas Card Dealer Collective Certified In Tip Suit

    A Texas federal judge certified a collective of card dealers for a Dallas poker club who alleged they were paid below minimum wage because they were forced to share their tips with managers, finding Tuesday that their responsibilities were similar enough to support proceeding as a group.

  • July 09, 2024

    Amazon Judge Offers To Quit COVID Pay Case

    A Colorado federal judge urged Amazon and workers suing the company over unpaid COVID-19 screenings to file briefs on whether he should recuse himself from the case, disclosing that his son works for what he believes is an Amazon affiliate.

  • July 09, 2024

    DOL Says It Can Regulate Foreign Farmworkers' Wages

    The U.S. Department of Labor has argued that it has had the authority to regulate wages for foreign H-2A farmworkers for about 40 years, telling a Georgia federal court that 17 Republican attorneys general and two entities cannot halt a rule that just went into effect.

  • July 09, 2024

    Ex-Workers Seek To Appeal $1.3M Tip Deal Denial

    Former employees accusing eight New York City vegan restaurants of wage violations asked a federal judge for a quick appeal of an order denying a proposed $1.3 million settlement, arguing the Second Circuit's take will bring the litigation to a much faster conclusion.

  • July 09, 2024

    NH Brewery Pays $918K For Tip, OT Infractions

    A brewery in New Hampshire paid nearly $918,000 for stiffing 44 workers on their full tips and wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday.

  • July 09, 2024

    Why Stopping 'Hot' Goods Is Key To Fighting Child Labor

    The U.S. Department of Labor's efforts to combat child exploitation include the use of the Fair Labor Standards Act's provision on "hot" goods, an important tool that ups the ante for accountability across the supply chain, experts say.

  • July 08, 2024

    Polsinelli Adds Prominent Employment Attys To Calif. Offices

    Polsinelli LLP has added a pair of experienced labor and employment attorneys to its Los Angeles and San Francisco offices, bolstering the firm's wage-and-hour and general employment practice in the Golden State, according to an announcement made Monday.

  • July 08, 2024

    UPS Beats 'Old Boys' Club' Gender Bias Suit For Good

    United Parcel Service Inc. scored a pretrial win Monday in a lawsuit claiming it passed over women for promotions and gave men better pay and working conditions after a California federal judge ruled that the three plaintiffs hadn't done enough to show the shipping company discriminated against them.

Expert Analysis

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • 2026 World Cup: Companies Face Labor Challenges And More

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    Companies sponsoring or otherwise involved with the 2026 FIFA World Cup — hosted jointly by the U.S., Canada and Mexico — should be proactive in preparing to navigate many legal considerations in immigration, labor management and multijurisdictional workforces surrounding the event, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Workplace AI Risks

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools penetrate workplaces, employers should incorporate sound AI policies and procedures in their handbooks in order to mitigate liability risks, maintain control of the technology, and protect their brands, says Laura Corvo at White and Williams.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Investigation Lessons In 'Minority Report'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper discuss how themes in Steven Spielberg's Science Fiction masterpiece "Minority Report" — including prediction, prevention and the fallibility of systems — can have real-life implications in workplace investigations.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Trial Tips For Fighting Worker PPE Pay Claims

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    Courts have struggled for decades to reach consensus on whether employees must be paid for time spent donning and doffing personal protective equipment, but this convoluted legal history points to practical trial strategies to help employers defeat these Fair Labor Standards Act claims, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • Employer Lessons From NLRB Judge's Union Bias Ruling

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge’s recent decision that a Virginia drywall contractor unlawfully transferred and fired workers who made union pay complaints illustrates valuable lessons about how employers should respond to protected labor activity and federal labor investigations, says Kenneth Jenero at Holland & Knight.

  • 9 Tools To Manage PAGA Claims After Calif. High Court Ruling

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    In Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills, the California Supreme Court recently dealt a blow to employers by ruling that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, but defendants and courts can still use arbitration agreements, due process challenges and other methods when dealing with unmanageable claims, says Ryan Krueger at Sheppard Mullin.

  • The 7th Circ.'s Top 10 Civil Opinions Of 2023

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    Attorneys at Jenner & Block examine the most significant decisions issued by the Seventh Circuit in 2023, and explain how they may affect issues related to antitrust, constitutional law, federal jurisdiction and more.