Wage & Hour

  • June 27, 2024

    Uber, Lyft Cut $175M Deal To End Mass. Worker Status Fight

    Uber Technologies Inc. and Lyft Inc. on Thursday agreed to pay a combined $175 million and provide drivers with a suite of benefits to settle an employee classification lawsuit brought by the state of Massachusetts.

  • June 27, 2024

    11th Circ. Upholds Radiology Practice's FMLA Suit Win

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday backed a Florida radiology practice's defeat of a doctor's lawsuit alleging he was fired because he requested medical leave, ruling a lower court didn't err when it blocked him from presenting evidence he hadn't previously disclosed.

  • June 27, 2024

    Austin Public Utility Co. Can't Defuse Wage Suit

    A power utility run by the City of Austin, Texas, can't dodge allegations that it purposely failed to pay a former customer service representative overtime premiums even though she regularly worked 50 hours a week, with a federal judge finding Thursday that she brought enough evidence to keep her claims in play.

  • June 27, 2024

    DOL Says It Put Salary Levels In OT Carveout Since 1938

    The U.S. Department of Labor told a Texas federal court it included a minimum salary aspect in executive, administrative or professional rules since the Fair Labor Standards Act's inception, arguing a marketing firm doesn't have the basis to halt a final overtime rule.

  • June 27, 2024

    Ala. Adult Care Co. Owes $202K For Wage Violations

    The owner of two adult care homes in Alabama will pay nearly $202,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying workers their full wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Thursday.

  • June 27, 2024

    Lewis Brisbois Adds Employment Atty In Nevada

    Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP announced that a labor and employment attorney with more than 40 years of experience has joined the firm's Reno, Nevada, office as a partner.

  • June 27, 2024

    Ga. School District, Bus Drivers Settle OT Bonus Suit

    A Georgia school district agreed to pay nearly $114,000 to end a collective action accusing it of underpaying employees on overtime by failing to include a retention bonus when calculating their time-and-a-half rate, according to a motion to approve the deal filed in federal court.

  • June 27, 2024

    5th Circ. Backs Former Steel Co. Worker's Win In OT Suit

    A former employee of a Texas-based steel fabrication and erection company supported his claims that his former employer owes him overtime, a Fifth Circuit panel ruled, affirming a lower court's decision awarding the worker more than $80,000.

  • June 27, 2024

    Appeal Of Wash. Pay Range Suit Remand Gets Shut Down

    A Washington federal judge refused to certify an appeal to the Ninth Circuit concerning the lower court's decision to remand to state court a lawsuit alleging retailer Aaron's should have included pay ranges in job advertisements, saying that state court is the ideal venue to interpret state law.

  • June 26, 2024

    Workers Feeling PWFA's Impact After 1st Year In Effect

    The Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, which took effect one year ago Thursday, has brought about more pregnancy accommodations for workers without causing overwhelming compliance challenges for employers, attorneys on both sides of the bar say.

  • June 26, 2024

    Jury Says Colo. Gas Co. Owes Trader $3.3M For Texas Deals

    A Colorado state jury on Wednesday found that a gas marketing company breached an employment agreement and violated the Colorado Wage Claim Act when it failed to pay a trading director a $3.3 million bonus from natural gas trades made during a historic 2021 winter storm.

  • June 26, 2024

    Veteran Says Starbucks Fired Him Over Parental Leave

    Starbucks retaliated against an Army veteran who took time off after the birth of his child by firing him during a Teams call, a lawsuit in Washington federal court claims.

  • June 26, 2024

    Texas Pizza Restaurant To Pay $30K For Tip, OT Violations

    A pizza restaurant in Texas will pay nearly $30,000 to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it operated an invalid tip pool and failed to pay proper overtime rates, according to court papers filed Wednesday.

  • June 26, 2024

    Nurses Say Mich. Hospitals Owe OT For Meal Break Work

    Two locations of a Michigan healthcare system unlawfully require employees to work through their meal breaks without pay in violation of federal wage law, according to two separate proposed collective actions filed in federal court.

  • June 26, 2024

    Project 2025 Author Talks Vision For A Future Trump DOL

    If former President Donald Trump wins reelection, the U.S. Department of Labor could return to wage and hour standards from his prior administration, and there could be a push for Congress to update what counts toward overtime, according to employment attorney Jonathan Berry’s Project 2025 policy recommendations. Berry spoke with Law360 about his recommendations.

  • June 26, 2024

    Paper Manufacturer, Ex-Worker's $500K Wage Deal Approved

    A California federal judge placed the final stamp of approval on a $500,000 deal ending claims that a paper company didn't pay a class of over 3,000 workers minimum wages or provide meal and rest breaks owed under state law.

  • June 26, 2024

    Mass. Dunkin' Managers Can Sue For OT As Collective

    A Massachusetts federal judge granted an unopposed request to certify a collective action brought by managers at 60-plus Dunkin' Donuts locations who claim they were required to work more than 40 hours a week without overtime pay.

  • June 26, 2024

    Whole Foods Resolves Time-Shaving Class Action

    Whole Foods has resolved a proposed class action alleging the grocer trimmed workers' paychecks if they came back slightly late from breaks.

  • June 25, 2024

    Public Pensions Have Personnel Authority, Calif. Panel Rules

    A county public employee retirement system has the authority to create employment classifications and set its employees' salaries, a California appellate court ruled Monday, reviving the Los Angeles County Employees Retirement Association's lawsuit seeking confirmation of its authority to make key personnel decisions.

  • June 25, 2024

    Gas Co. Says Trader Flouted Credit Cap For $37M Storm Trades

    A Colorado gas marketing company Tuesday urged a jury to find that an ex-trader ignored a credit policy when he helped make $37 million worth of natural gas trades during a historic 2021 winter storm, arguing that none of his testifying co-workers backed up his story.

  • June 25, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Bless More Relief For Fired FCA Worker

    A former Fiat Chrysler Automobiles employee who scored a $148,000 arbitration award on claims that he was wrongly fired for taking approved time off can't get more damages or reinstatement to the exact position he once held, the Sixth Circuit ruled.

  • June 25, 2024

    9th Circ. Remands Wage Row After High Court Revival

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday remanded a wage and hour lawsuit against an on-demand delivery service to an Arizona district court after the U.S. Supreme Court in May overturned the appellate court's earlier conclusion that lawsuits can be dismissed while arbitration is occurring.

  • June 25, 2024

    Pa. Steelworkers Want Pay For Pre-, Post-Work Duties

    U.S. Steel workers at a steel mill outside Pittsburgh haven't been paid for the time they spend donning and doffing protective gear and walking between the locker room and workspaces, a utility technician claimed in a lawsuit filed in Pennsylvania state court.

  • June 25, 2024

    Fla. Charter School Settles OT, Retaliation Suit

    A Florida charter school will pay $12,500 to end a suit alleging it failed to pay a custodian for more than 40 hours a week and fired her when she complained about it, according to court papers.

  • June 25, 2024

    Oracle Can Seek PAGA Arbitration, Calif. Panel Says

    A California appellate panel said Oracle could compel two workers' 7-year-old individual Private Attorneys General Act wage claims into arbitration, holding that the arbitration agreements couldn't have been enforced until after the U.S. Supreme Court issued the Viking ruling in 2022.

Expert Analysis

  • Calif. Cos. May Have To Reimburse More Remote Work Costs

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    After a California appeals court's recent decision in Thai v. IBM, countless California employers will be required to pay work-related costs incurred by their employees who were sent home during the pandemic, and this could be just the beginning of a reckoning, say Sonya Goodwin at Sauer & Wagner.

  • Water Cooler Talk: 'The Bear' Serves Up Advice For Managers

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Ernst & Young’s Laura Yehuda about Hulu's "The Bear" and the best practices managers can glean from the show's portrayal of workplace challenges, including those faced by young, female managers.

  • Calif. Employers Note: Industrial Welfare Commission Is Back

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    An appropriations bill recently passed in California instructs the Industrial Welfare Commission to reconvene for the first time in 19 years, opening a door for the regulatory body to significantly affect employer operations by strengthening standards for meal and rest breaks, scheduling, record-keeping, and more, say Denisha McKenzie and John Keeney at CDF Labor Law.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Colorado Antitrust Reform Carries Broad State Impact

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    Colorado recently became the latest state to update and expand its antitrust laws, and the new act may significantly affect enforcement and private litigation, particularly when it comes to workers and consumers, says Diane Hazel at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Tips For Fighting Back Against Explosive Verdicts

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    Massive jury verdicts are a product of our time, driven in part by reptile tactics, but employers can build a strategic defense to mitigate the risk of a runaway jury, and develop tools to seek judicial relief in the event of an adverse outcome, say Dawn Solowey and Lynn Kappelman at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. PAGA Ruling Not A Total Loss For Employer Arbitration

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    Contrary to the conclusion reached in a recent Law360 guest article, the California Supreme Court’s ruling in Adolph v. Uber Technologies did not diminish the benefit of arbitrating employees’ individual Private Attorneys General Act claims, as the very limited ruling does not undermine U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says Steven Katz at Constangy.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Changing Status Quo In A Union Shop

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    A recent administrative law decision concerning a dispute between Fortune Media and the NewsGuild of New York is an important reminder to employers with unionized workforces to refrain from making unilateral updates to employee handbooks that will change the terms and conditions of employment, says Jennifer Hataway at Butler Snow.

  • Eye On Compliance: A Shift In Religious Accommodation Law

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    The recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Groff v. DeJoy is making it more difficult for employers to deny religious accommodations, and there are three takeaways employers should keep in mind, say William Cook and Matthew High at Wilson Elser.

  • FLSA Collective Actions: Are Courts Still Dancing The 2-Step?

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    In the absence of amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act, courts have filled in some of the statute's gaps and established a two-step framework for conditional certification of a class, but recent rulings show signs that courts are ready to hold party plaintiffs to a higher standard if they want to recruit others to join their lawsuits, says Allison Powers at Barack Ferrazzano.

  • Calif. PAGA Ruling Devalues Arbitration For Employers

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    The California Supreme Court’s recent opinion in Adolph v. Uber may lessen employers' appetites for arbitration under the state’s Private Attorneys General Act, because arbitrating an allegedly aggrieved employee’s individual claims is unlikely to dispose of their nonindividual claims, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Understanding Illinois' Temp Worker Obligation Updates

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    Recent amendments to the Illinois Day and Temporary Labor Services Act would significantly expand the protection for temporary workers in the state, impose new compliance obligations on staffing agencies and their client companies, and add significant enforcement teeth to the act, say Nicholas Anaclerio and Ellie Hemminger at Vedder Price.

  • How End Of Forced Arb. Is Affecting Sex Harassment Cases

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    A little over a year after the Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault Act became effective, we have started seeing substantive interpretation of the EFAA, almost exclusively from the U.S. district courts in New York, and there are two key takeaways for employers, says Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.