Wage & Hour

  • June 20, 2024

    Wind Farm Worker Can't Use Ill. Wage Law For Claim To Pay

    A wind farm does not owe a former office manager continuing royalty payments under Illinois state law, a state appellate court ruled, saying the royalties aren't considered final compensation because the wind farm did not start generating electricity until a year after she retired.

  • June 20, 2024

    As Viking Decision Turns 2, Calif. Seeks Pre-Election PAGA Fix

    California’s governor and lawmakers want to update the state's Private Attorneys General Act before the certification of a proposed ballot measure that would repeal the law, a development happening as the U.S. Supreme Court's Viking ruling on arbitration of claims under the statute turns two. Here, Law360 explores where PAGA stands.

  • June 20, 2024

    NY Construction Co. Denied Workers OT, Suit Says

    A construction company paid workers a flat hourly rate and denied them overtime rates even though they regularly worked more than 40 hours a week, a worker alleged Thursday in a proposed class and collective action in New York federal court.

  • June 20, 2024

    DOL Says Emergency Discovery Needed In OT Rule Challenge

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged a Texas federal court to expedite a targeted request for discovery in a suit seeking to stop a new overtime rule from going into effect, saying that the information is necessary to tackle the injunction bid.

  • June 20, 2024

    Rocket Mortgage Hit With Race Bias, FMLA Suit

    Rocket Mortgage refused to let a Black associate banker transfer positions while letting her white counterparts do so, held her to stricter standards, reduced her wages and eventually terminated her partly due to her use of medical leave, she said in a complaint lodged in Michigan federal court.

  • June 18, 2024

    Newsom, Legislators Reach Agreement On PAGA Reform

    California Gov. Gavin Newsom and state legislative leaders on Tuesday unveiled reforms to California's Private Attorneys General Act, including major changes to the law's penalty structure, changes they say will avoid a "contentious" ballot measure campaign.

  • June 18, 2024

    Amazon Hit With $5.9M Fine For Violating Calif. Quota Law

    California's labor commissioner has fined Amazon $5.9 million for violating the Golden State's Warehouse Quotas Law, which requires employers to give workers written notice of any quotas they must follow, according to a Tuesday announcement.

  • June 18, 2024

    Feds Say Discovery Order Exposes Migrants To Retaliation

    The U.S. Department of Labor is urging a Mississippi federal court to reconsider ordering the disclosure of informants' identities in an investigation into a fish farm's labor practices, saying the May order exposed the informants, who are also migrant employees at the farm, to possible retaliation.

  • June 18, 2024

    Ex-Twitter Workers Seek Class Cert. In Arbitration Fee Fight

    A group of former Twitter workers who accuse X Corp. of stalling their employment disputes by refusing to pay arbitration fees urged a California federal judge Monday to certify multiple classes of workers over allegations their arbitration efforts have been thwarted by the social media giant.

  • June 18, 2024

    Meat Plant Workers Seek OK On Latest $4M Wage-Fix Deal

    Red meat processing plant workers have sought preliminary approval for their latest settlement over wage-fixing claims, a $4 million deal that adds American Foods Group LLC to the list of companies to cut deals that also includes JBS, Tyson, Perdue, Seaboard, Triumph and consulting firm Webber Meng Sahl & Co.

  • June 18, 2024

    7th Circ. Brings Back Cruise Worker's OT Suit

    The Seventh Circuit revived a proposed collective action Tuesday accusing a steamboat cruise company of depriving workers of overtime wages, finding Indiana arbitration law states that the pact the worker and company signed is governed by, and is invalid under, the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • June 18, 2024

    2nd Pa. Jury Can't Agree On Uber Black Drivers' Status

    A second Pennsylvania federal jury was unable to determine whether Uber Black drivers are the company's employees or independent contractors, telling the trial judge on Tuesday that the eight members were hopelessly deadlocked.

  • June 18, 2024

    Ogletree Adds Quarles & Brady Litigator In San Diego

    Labor and employment firm Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC has hired from Quarles & Brady LLP a new shareholder for its San Diego office who has more than a decade of experience.

  • June 18, 2024

    Bakery Wants To Stop Quick Appeal Of Arbitration Order

    A bakery urged a Connecticut federal judge to deny two food distributors' bid for a quick appeal of an order directing them to arbitrate their independent contractor misclassification claims, saying the request "falls woefully short" of the standards for an appeal.

  • June 18, 2024

    Liberty University Settles Time Sheet Suit

    Liberty University will pay $30,000 to end a proposed collective action alleging that its supervisors of intramural sports employees tampered with workers' time records to cap their schedules at 40 hours per week to avoid paying them overtime, according to court papers filed Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2024

    Mayer Brown Adds Litigation Vet As Employment Co-Chair

    Mayer Brown LLP said Tuesday it added an employment litigation veteran with nearly two decades of experience to co-lead the firm's employment litigation and counseling practice.

  • June 18, 2024

    High Court May Help Employers Claiming Overtime Exemption

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision this week to review evidentiary standards in wage and hour cases is likely to result in a ruling amplifying the justices' 2018 precedent that statutory exemptions from overtime should be construed fairly, rather than narrowly

  • June 18, 2024

    NJ Steakhouse Pays $90K For Stiffing Workers On Wages

    A New Jersey steakhouse paid nearly $90,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying 13 workers their overtime wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2024

    Workers Score Default Win In Trucking Co. Wage Suit

    A now-defunct trucking company must pay about $93,000 to end a suit alleging it didn't pay two workers minimum and overtime wages, a California federal judge ordered, after granting the workers' bid for default judgment last year.

  • June 18, 2024

    Va. City Can't Ax Atty's Wrongful Firing Suit Over FMLA Fraud

    A federal judge declined to toss an attorney's suit claiming the Virginia city he worked for illegally fired him and accused him of doctoring a medical form he needed to care for his sick mother, saying he showed the city may have stepped on his medical leave rights.

  • June 18, 2024

    Treasury Finalizes Labor Rules For Bonus Energy Tax Credits

    The U.S. Treasury Department released final labor rules Tuesday for clean energy projects seeking to significantly boost the value of their tax credits, emphasizing due diligence by developers and announcing that more IRS resources will go toward enforcement of the rules.

  • June 17, 2024

    Third Pa. Uber Trial Unlikely As Deadlock Again Looms

    With a second deadlocked jury appearing imminent in the Philadelphia UberBlack employment classification trial, a Pennsylvania federal judge on Monday told attorneys he was skeptical a third trial is on the way to resolve the case.

  • June 17, 2024

    9th Circ. Tosses Cleaner's Appeal In Misclassification Row

    The Ninth Circuit ruled Monday that it lacks jurisdiction over a worker's challenge of a district court's decision refusing to reopen his suit claiming a janitorial franchising company misclassified workers as independent contractors.

  • June 17, 2024

    Shell, HF Sinclair Settle USW's Meme Poster Back Pay Dispute

    Shell Oil and HF Sinclair have settled a dispute over which company is responsible for back pay to a worker who was fired after posting a meme that was found not to be grounds for termination, following the United Steelworkers' bid for enforcement of an arbitration award.

  • June 17, 2024

    Amazon Seeks To Trim Reopened Contractor Wage Suit

    Amazon urged a Washington federal judge to toss claims in a long-running, recently reopened lawsuit alleging the company misclassified drivers as independent contractors, saying the workers still had not provided any concrete evidence to support their claims.

Expert Analysis

  • Check Onboarding Docs To Protect Arbitration Agreements

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    The California Court of Appeal's recent Alberto v. Cambrian Homecare decision opens a new and unexpected avenue of attack on employment arbitration agreements in California — using other employment-related agreements to render otherwise enforceable arbitration agreements unenforceable, say Morgan Forsey and Ian Michalak at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Remote Work Considerations In A Post-Pandemic World

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    Now that the public health emergency has ended, employers may reevaluate their obligations to allow remote work, as well as the extent to which they must compensate remote working expenses, though it's important to examine any requests under the Americans With Disabilities Act, say Dan Kaplan and Jacqueline Hayduk at Foley & Lardner.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Remote Work Policies

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    Implementing a remote work policy that clearly articulates eligibility, conduct and performance expectations for remote employees can ease employers’ concerns about workers they may not see on a daily basis, says Melissa Spence at Butler Snow.

  • An Overview Of Calif. Berman Hearings For Wage Disputes

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    While California's Berman hearings are pro-employee procedures that are accessible, informal and affordable mechanisms for parties filing a claim to recover unpaid wages, there are some disadvantages to the process such as delays, says David Cheng at FordHarrison.

  • No Blank Space In Case Law On Handling FMLA Abuse

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    Daniel Schwartz at Shipman & Goodwin discusses real-world case law that guides employers on how to handle suspected Family and Medical Leave Act abuse, specifically in instances where employees attended or performed in a concert while on leave — with Taylor Swift’s ongoing Eras Tour as a hypothetical backdrop.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Bias Lessons From 'Partner Track'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with CyberRisk Alliance's Ying Wong, about how Netflix's show "Partner Track" tackles conscious and unconscious bias at law firms, and offer some key observations for employers and their human resources departments on avoiding these biases.

  • History Supports 2nd Circ. View Of FAA Transport Exemption

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    In the circuit split over when transport workers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, sparked by the 2022 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Southwest Airlines v. Saxon, the Second Circuit reached a more faithful interpretation — one supported by historical litigation and legislative context, though perhaps arrived at via the wrong route, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Employers Need Clarity On FLSA Joint Employer Liability

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    A judicial patchwork of multifactor tests to determine joint employment liability has led to unpredictable results, and only congressional action or enactment of a uniform standard to which courts will consistently defer can give employers the clarity needed to structure their relationships with workers, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. Independent Contractor Lessons From Grubhub Suit

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    California courts have been creating little in the way of clarity when it comes to the employment status of gig workers — and a recent federal court decision in Lawson v. Grubhub illustrates how status may change with the winds of litigation, offering four takeaways for businesses that rely on delivery drivers, say Esra Hudson and Marah Bragdon at Manatt.

  • Labor Collusion Loss Will Shape DOJ's Case Strategy

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    Following the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent loss in United States v. Manahe, tallying its trial score record to 0-3 in labor-related antitrust cases over the past year, defendants can expect that the DOJ will try to exclude defense evidence and argue for more favorable jury instructions, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Staffing Company Considerations Amid PAGA Uncertainty

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    The impending California Supreme Court decision in Adolph v. Uber is expected to affect staffing companies, specifically how the proliferation of nonindividual Private Attorneys General Act claims are handled when the individual claim is compelled to arbitration, say Sarah Kroll-Rosenbaum and Harrison Thorne at Akerman.

  • Eye On Compliance: Joint Employment

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    Madonna Herman at Wilson Elser breaks down the key job conditions that led to a recent National Labor Relations Board finding of joint employment, and explains the similar standard established under California case law — providing a guide for companies that want to minimize liability when relying on temporary and contract workers.

  • How Unions Could Stem Possible Wave Of Calif. PAGA Claims

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    Should the California Supreme Court hold in Adolph v. Uber that the nonindividual portions of Private Attorneys General Act claims survive even after individual claims go to arbitration, employers and unions could both leverage the holding in Oswald v. Murray to stifle the resurgence in representative suits, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.