Legal Ethics

  • June 17, 2024

    McConnell Denounces Judicial Nominee For District Of Ore.

    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., took to the Senate floor on Monday to criticize Magistrate Judge Mustafa Taher Kasubhai, a nominee for a district court judgeship in the District of Oregon whose confirmation vote is teed up for Tuesday. 

  • June 17, 2024

    Feds Say Bannon Must Go To Prison During Appeals

    The U.S. government on Monday urged the D.C. Circuit to reject Donald Trump ally Steve Bannon's bid to stave off his four-month prison sentence for contempt of Congress, arguing that Bannon cannot show that the full D.C. Circuit or U.S. Supreme Court would take up his case.

  • June 17, 2024

    LA City Atty Accused Of Retaliating Against Criminal Chief

    The former criminal chief of the Los Angeles city attorney's office is seeking more than $1 million over claims she faced a "barrage of retaliation" and was unfairly placed on leave after reporting the city attorney's alleged excessive on-the-job alcohol consumption, her refusal to prosecute certain companies and other purported misconduct.

  • June 17, 2024

    NYC Bar Blasts Judges' Columbia Boycott Letter

    The New York City Bar Association on Monday questioned the impartiality of 13 federal judges who issued a letter last month publicly refusing to hire students from Columbia Law School as clerks because of campus political protests over the Israel-Hamas war.

  • June 17, 2024

    Attys Accused Of Judge Shopping Must Turn Over Q&A Doc

    Attorneys accused of a coordinated effort to "judge shop" amid federal suits challenging an Alabama law banning certain medical procedures for transgender youth must supply a document the court believes displays the attorneys' preparations for a panel hearing in which one of the attorneys allegedly committed perjury.

  • June 17, 2024

    Ga. Judge Shuts Down Bond Bid From Convicted Fla. Atty

    A Georgia federal judge has denied a Florida attorney's request to remain free on bond while she appeals her conviction and more than six-year prison sentence for fraudulently obtaining federal pandemic-relief loans meant for businesses, calling her request "the latest chapter in her attempt to dodge the consequences of her malevolence."

  • June 17, 2024

    Baldwin Prosecutors Push For 'Rust' Armorer's Testimony

    New Mexico state prosecutors are seeking to force a convicted armorer to testify during "Rust" actor-producer Alec Baldwin's involuntary manslaughter trial, telling a judge the "world is watching" how the court decides a potentially pivotal legal dispute in the high-profile case.

  • June 17, 2024

    Clients Say McGrath Kavinoky 'Bullied' Them Into Abuse Deal

    California firm McGrath Kavinoky LLP, which inked more than $374 million in settlements for women who say they were sexually abused by a UCLA Health gynecologist, misled its clients and "bullied" them into accepting far smaller amounts than they were promised, according to a lawsuit in state court by two ex-clients.

  • June 17, 2024

    Texas Bar Proposes Limits On Services From In-House Attys

    The State Bar of Texas said in-house lawyers working for companies owned by nonattorneys are barred from providing legal services to the businesses' customers unless the work meets specific criteria because otherwise, the companies run afoul of rules forbidding the unauthorized practice of law, according to a proposed ethics opinion.

  • June 17, 2024

    Biden: High Court 'Never Been As Out Of Kilter'

    President Joe Biden said at a campaign event over the weekend that the U.S. Supreme Court "has never been as out of kilter as it is today."

  • June 17, 2024

    NJ Power Broker, Firm CEO Brother Accused Of Racketeering

    Powerful New Jersey businessman George E. Norcross III and his brother who is the chief executive officer of law firm Parker McCay have been criminally charged alongside others in a scheme to acquire waterfront property in the distressed city of Camden using threats of economic and reputational harm.

  • June 14, 2024

    Ozy Trial Gets Heated, Exec Tells Of Lies, Google CEO Pops In

    Courtroom tempers flared, Alphabet and Google CEO Sundar Pichai dropped by and a former Ozy Media executive on Friday told the jury weighing fraud charges against the startup's charismatic founder Carlos Watson of how they nearly conned Buzzfeed into buying the company by faking its financials.

  • June 14, 2024

    Mistrial Declared In Florida Student Debtor Lawsuit

    A Florida federal judge on Friday declared a mistrial in the lawsuit against a Boca Raton-based law firm accused of falsely promising to eliminate student loan debts in exchange for a fee following testimony from a former client.

  • June 14, 2024

    Hunter Biden Axes Data Privacy Suit Against Giuliani, For Now

    Hunter Biden has tentatively agreed to drop a federal computer fraud and digital privacy suit against Rudy Giuliani and various other defendants relating to alleged data theft from his infamous laptop, after the case was partially stalled due to Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings Giuliani commenced in December.

  • June 14, 2024

    Defense Atty Group Backs Law Firm In Guo Trustee Clawback

    The New York Council of Defense Lawyers has slammed a Chapter 11 trustee's attempt to claw back legal fees from an Empire State law firm that represented three nondebtor entities associated with bankrupt Chinese exile Miles Guo, saying it "burdens the Sixth Amendment" right to counsel.

  • June 14, 2024

    Burford Bound To Sysco And Pilgrim's Unsigned Chicken Deal

    An Illinois federal judge on Friday rejected a Burford subsidiary's bid to block a global protein price-fixing settlement that Pilgrim's Pride and Sysco memorialized through email but never signed on paper, saying it's clear the parties reached a material agreement.

  • June 14, 2024

    Pa. Court Allows 'Special Prosecutor' For Philly Transit

    Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner cannot stop the Pennsylvania Legislature and the state attorney general from appointing a "special prosecutor" to handle crimes within the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, according to a split state appellate court Friday.

  • June 14, 2024

    DOJ Declines To Prosecute AG Garland For Contempt

    The U.S. Department of Justice is declining to prosecute Attorney General Merrick Garland after the House voted earlier this week to hold him in contempt for not turning over audio recordings of the president and his ghostwriter speaking with special counsel Robert Hur for his investigation into President Joe Biden's handling of classified documents.

  • June 14, 2024

    Fla. Bar, State High Court Beat Atty's Racketeering Suit

    A Florida attorney who faces disbarment for "brandishing a dangerous weapon" was not wrongfully prevented from changing his status to "permanent retirement" instead, a federal judge has ruled, dismissing the disgruntled attorney's lengthy racketeering lawsuit against the Supreme Court of Florida and the Florida Bar.

  • June 14, 2024

    NJ Chief Justice Depo 'Redundant' In Pension Fight, Court Told

    The New Jersey judiciary urged the state court to deny a bid to depose Chief Justice Stuart Rabner in a suit brought by a former Superior Court judge over the denial of her disability pension application, arguing she can't meet the heightened burden required to depose a high-ranking official and that the chief justice's testimony is privileged.

  • June 14, 2024

    Florida Attorney, Philly Firm Settle Pay Dispute

    A Florida-based attorney who ran a side business as a litigation fee expert while also working for a Philadelphia-based personal injury law firm has settled her allegations that the firm stiffed her on a referral fee.

  • June 14, 2024

    Littler Aims To End Theft Suit After $1M Deal With Ex-Firm Atty

    Littler Mendelson PC this week moved to drop a lawsuit accusing a former associate of stealing confidential documents following a settlement in which the firm agreed to pay her nearly $1 million, though a separate, newer case in which the lawyer accuses Littler of violating that deal remains open.

  • June 14, 2024

    Texas Justices To Weigh Ethics Claims Against Paxton Deputy

    The Texas Supreme Court agreed Friday to review a lower court's decision to revive an ethics charge against Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton's first assistant over a failed lawsuit challenging the results of the 2020 election.

  • June 14, 2024

    Senate Passes Bill For State, Local Judge Security

    The U.S. Senate has passed a bill unanimously to better protect state and local judges from threats amid "unacceptable attacks" on the judiciary.

  • June 14, 2024

    Update On Ex-George Mason Prof's Suits Over Sex Allegations

    After two women came forward last August accusing former BigLaw partner, FTC commissioner and George Mason University law professor Joshua D. Wright of sexual improprieties with students and direct reports, a number of additional accusations and lawsuits followed. Here are updates on the litigation and everything else surrounding the allegations.

Expert Analysis

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • Perspectives

    Trauma-Informed Legal Approaches For Pro Bono Attorneys

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    As National Trauma Awareness Month ends, pro bono attorneys should nevertheless continue to acknowledge the mental and physical effects of trauma, allowing them to better represent clients, and protect themselves from compassion fatigue and burnout, say Katherine Cronin at Stinson and Katharine Manning at Blackbird.

  • Opinion

    NY Should Pass Litigation Funding Bill To Protect Plaintiffs

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    New York state should embrace the regulatory framework proposed in the Consumer Litigation Funding Act, which would suppress the unregulated predatory lenders that currently prey on vulnerable litigants but preserve a funding option that helps personal injury plaintiffs stand up to deep-pocketed corporate defendants, says Alan Ripka at Alan Ripka & Associates.

  • Series

    Playing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My deep and passionate involvement in playing, writing and producing music equipped me with skills — like creativity, improvisation and problem-solving — that contribute to the success of my legal career, says attorney Kenneth Greene.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Pitfalls When Withdrawing From A Case

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    The Trump campaign's recent scuffle over its bid to replace its counsel in a pregnancy retaliation suit offers a chance to remind attorneys that many troubles inherent in withdrawing from a case can be mitigated or entirely avoided by communicating with clients openly and frequently, says Christopher Konneker at Orsinger Nelson.

  • High Court Injunction Case Could Shake Up Fee-Shifting Rules

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    In agreeing to review a Virginia case rendered statutorily moot before final judgment, the U.S. Supreme Court could finally settle the question of if — and when — a preliminary injunction can win attorney fees for a prevailing party, but all possible answers could disrupt fee-shifting schemes written into major laws, says Laurens Wilkes at Winston & Strawn.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

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    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • Series

    Being An EMT Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While some of my experiences as an emergency medical technician have been unusually painful and searing, the skills I’ve learned — such as triage, empathy and preparedness — are just as useful in my work as a restructuring lawyer, says Marshall Huebner at Davis Polk.

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